There are only 2 ways of working

Description:
This talk goes into detail about how we usually plan projects in the industry and explains why planning things during a proof-of-concept phase is a very bad idea. We will follow an easy to understand line of reasoning of what effects a predictive work environment has in a situation where a lot of things like gameplay, pipelines or how a team is even supposed to work together. We will compare predictive and adaptive and what both approaches have as their main goal and why teams should be very conscious of which approch to choose in which situation.
Finally, we will explore how the creative process actually works and how a predictive process impacts it in a negative way.

Target audience: Project Leads, Producers, EPs, CEOs, Game Designer, Game Developers

Key Takeaways:
1. There are only 2 ways of working: adaptive & predictive. All work processes like Srum, Lean, Waterfall, etc… fall into either of these categories.
2. When things are clear: Use predictive
3. When things are unclear: Use adaptive
4. Creativity is needed for new things
5. Creativity is unpredictable

This talk goes into detail about how we usually plan projects in the industry and explains why planning things during a proof-of-concept phase is a very bad idea. We will follow an easy to understand line of reasoning of what effects a predictive work environment has in a situation where a lot of things like gameplay, pipelines or how a team is even supposed to work together. We will compare predictive and adaptive and what both approaches have as their main goal and why teams should be very conscious of which approch to choose in which situation.
Finally, we will explore how the creative process actually works and how a predictive process impacts it in a negative way.

Profile:
Guido Schmidt spent over 20 years in the game industry and worked for companies like Ubisoft, Paradox Interactive and Remedy. Starting out as a programmer he quickly transitioned into Game Design and later into Game Director roles. His focus on getting into the human psyche combined with his experience in game development created a unique understanding of how teams function, what is important when working with other people and how to become a better designer. It is the little things that make or break a game. The less tangible glue in between the cracks that make a project solid or fragile and this has been his interest for the larger part of his career.